When your pet gets sick or needs evaluation, CityVet is the best choice and best value for primary medical care.

We hope we do not have to see your pet for an emergency but if we do, we are equipped to handle the situation. Our knowledgeable staff and well-equipped facilities allow us to deal with the majority of pet medical and surgical conditions. In some cases, your pet may require hospitalization and further diagnostic tests.

We ensure that our clients receive the time they need and deserve with all members of our veterinary team, and top priority is given to client communication and education.

Select (below) to view the medical services we offer in more detail:

Complete Medical Assesment

A complete medical assessment begins with a thorough physical examination whereby your pet’s eyes, ears, skin, cardiovascular, neurological, gastrointestinal and skeletal system are examined for any abnormalities. Blood tests can be performed as necessary to assess the proper functioning of your pet’s kidneys, liver, pancreas, and endocrine system including the thyroid gland and adrenal glands. Urine tests can detect similar problems. Depending on your pet’s condition, we may recommend further diagnostic tests such as radiography (X-rays), endoscopy (internal scoping), ultrasound or surgery.

Cardiology (Heart)
A heart problem can affect your pet at any age although it is more often found in older pets.

Heart failure occurs when the heart no longer has the ability to pump blood around the body effectively. Heart failure can lead to congestive heart failure. If an animal is suffering from congestive heart failure, it usually accumulates fluid in the lungs although it can result in fluid accumulation in the abdomen as well. Animals suffering from congestive heart failure often experience difficulty breathing and frequent coughing. Some causes of heart failure include: congenital heart disease (animals born with a heart problem), valvular heart disease (abnormalities of the valves of the heart), heartworm disease, and arrythmias (rhythm disturbances).

Many heart problems can be identified on physical examination.

Additional tests are usually required to accurately identify the cause of the heart disease. Additional tests include EKGs (electrocardiograms), radiographs (X-rays), and ultrasounds.

Heart disease is a serious life threatening condition but early diagnosis and appropriate therapy can extend your pet’s life.

Flea & Tick Control
Fleas and Ticks

Fleas and ticks are common ectoparasites of dogs, cats, and other mammals. Fleas and ticks are transmitted from animal to animal, as well as by the environment. Many pets are exposed to fleas and ticks outside in yards, patios, dog parks, or on walks. Humans can even bring fleas into their home on their shoes and clothing. Fleas and ticks cause itching, hair loss, allergies, anemia, skin infection, as well as transmitting parasites such as tapeworms or serious diseases such as Ehrlichiosis, Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever, and Lymes disease. Pets living in Texas should be on flea and tick prevention year-round.

More About Treating Fleas

Fleas are a very common skin disease of dogs and cats in the southern United States. An adult female flea can lay up to 60 eggs a day. Since fleas can multiply so quickly, it is easy to see how rapidly a flea infestation can occur. There are four life stages in the life of a flea: adult, egg, larva, and pupa. The adult flea spends its time on the dog or cat, while the egg, larva, and pupa develop in the environment. It is important to treat the environment as well as the pet in order to get rid of fleas.

Treat the pet

A pet with fleas should be given a Capstar initially to kill the adult fleas on the pet. Capstar starts to kill adult fleas within 30 minutes and kills fleas for up to seven hours. Once an animal has received Capstar, either a topical product such as Frontline, Revolution or Tritak should be applied or an oral product such as Comfortis or Trifexis should be given to continue killing fleas on the pet for weeks. Some topical flea products are adulticides (kills adult fleas) as well as insect growth regulators (keep fleas from hatching eggs). Flea products should be applied initially, repeated in two to four weeks, and then applied monthly to prevent reinfestation.

Treat the Environment

The pet’s environment should be treated at the same time the pet is treated for fleas. Indoors, the area should be treated with an environmental spray such as Knockout or Mycodex environmental spray. Fleas like to live in dark, shady areas. The spray should be applied along baseboards and under furniture. After spray application, vacuum the whole house and throw the vacuum bag away so the fleas don’t hatch in the vacuum bag. The pet’s bedding should be washed and dried. The outdoor environment should be treated, too. This can be done professionally or with an area treatment. Area treatment products can be purchased at our clinic, a pet supply store, or at a hardware store.

Remember:

The key to preventing fleas is monthly application of a topical or oral flea preventative such as Frontline, Revolution, Tritak, Comfortis or Trifexis.  Without consistent monthly application, your pet will be susceptible to fleas.

A flea problem on your pet means a flea problem in your home. Understanding the flea life cycle and methods for its control can be a daunting task. We will gladly assist you in this process. We can provide you with safe, effective flea prevention and if necessary, flea treatment.

Flea & Heartworm prevention are critically important for the health and comfort of your pets.

We are committed to being the best value for Flea & Heartworm products, better than other veterinary practices and leading online pharmacies, because we know how important they are for your pet. We believe that as your veterinarian and pet care partner, we can best navigate the complexity of product options and advise you on the safety, efficacy and cost benefit of each one, in light of your specific situation.

Online pharmacies don’t have the benefit of knowing your pet, and they certainly don’t have the veterinarian-client-patient relationship required by law to sell you prescription products. CityVet is the smart choice for all your flea and heartworm prevention needs. We make it easy for you to make choices, because we offer our own price match guarantee — just print out the page with the online pharmacies’ price on the product you desire and we’ll match that price for you, no questions asked.

Heartworm Prevention
Canine Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is spread by mosquitoes. Cases of heartworm disease have been documented in all of the 48 contiguous states. Primary hosts and reservoirs of infection are domestic and wild canines, however, other hosts are domestic cats, non-domesticated cats, ferrets, and the California sea lion.

The disease is caused by the mosquito-borne filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. Endemic areas such as Texas provide adequate temperature and humidity to support a viable mosquito population year-round. Mosquitoes are outdoors and indoors; therefore “indoor” animals are affected as well.

Dirofilaria immitis (heartworms) live out part of their life cycle in the mosquito, and part in the host mammal. The non-infective stage of heartworm larvae may circulate in the blood of host for more than two years following release by pregnant female in an infected animal. This animal becomes a source of infection for other dogs and cats via transmission by a mosquito. The larva (microfilaria) must be ingested by a mosquito before development to the next life stage can continue.

  • The mosquito bites an infected animal and carries the infective heartworm larvae (L1)
  • The infective heartworm matures in the mosquito in order to infect another host
  • Infective larvae (L3) migrate to proboscis (nose) of mosquito; waiting to infect another host
  • Infected larvae (called microfilaria) are deposited on the skin and enter the host through a mosquito bite wound
  • Once a host is bitten, the larvae molt and mature over the next two weeks in the subcutaneous tissues (L4)
  • The larvae mature in the heart and lungs over the next 50-70 days post mosquito bite (L5)
  • Heartworms reside in the heart, lungs, and associated vessels of the host by 70-110 days post infection
  • Adult heartworms mate and females release their offspring by 5 to 6.5 months post infection
  • Adult heartworms may survive up to 8 years in the dog, and 1 to 3 years in the cat

The adult heartworm is directly responsible for nearly all of signs of disease, although some disease is related to microfilaria in lungs and kidneys. Space occupying worms in arteries lead to destruction of arteries, emboli and thrombosis (acts like blood clots), and hypertension (high blood pressure). Pulmonary hypertension leads to enlargement of right ventricle of heart, interference with heart valves, and congestive heart failure. Typically, severe inflammation will occur in the lungs.

Clinical signs of heartworm disease vary with the stage of disease and severity of disease. Most dogs do not develop signs before a year post infection (due to parasite’s long life cycle). Some dogs are asymptomatic, but typical symptoms include: nonproductive cough, labored breathing, exercise intolerance, syncope (fainting), weight loss or loss of muscle mass, and ascites (fluid accumulation in abdomen).

Heartworm disease is diagnosed fairly easily in dogs. The diagnostic test of choice is an antigen test which tests for the presence of mature female heartworms. An antigen test is a simple blood test that can be run in the hospital or sent to an outside lab. This test is the most specific and sensitive test for diagnosing heartworm disease in dogs. False positive antigen tests are extremely rare and usually result from technical error. False negatives can occur with immature infections, light infections (<5 worms), or unisex infections. Other tests include microfilaria tests (tests for baby heartworms), radiology, echo cardiology. However, microfilaria tests (direct blood smears, Difil®, Modified Knott’s test) may be used in tandem with antigen tests, but should not be used as sole method of testing due to the fact that 20 to 75% of heartworm infected dogs do not have circulating microfilaria.

Heartworm disease in dogs must be staged to determine the severity of the disease prior to treatment. Staging includes a physical exam, a complete blood count, a serum biochemical profile, and a urinalysis. Confirmation antigen testing is typically performed (two tests) and microfilaria tests may be done in an attempt to determine worm burden.

The course of treatment of heartworm disease depends on class or stage of the disease:

  • Class 1: sub clinical disease- often no clinical signs, lab tests and x-rays usually normal
  • Class 2: moderate disease- moderate exercise intolerance or occasional cough, moderate heart and pulmonary artery involvement
  • Class 3: severe disease- obvious clinical signs such as exercise intolerance, respiratory distress, cough, weight loss; severe heart and pulmonary artery involvement
  • Caval syndrome: very severe disease (often fatal)- severe weakness and collapse; worms completely obstruct tricuspid valve of heart and obstruct major blood vessel (the vena cava)

The goal of treatment is to kill all adult worms with an adulticide and kill all microfilaria with a microfilaricide. The ideal treatment should have minimum harmful effects from drugs, and a tolerable degree of complications created by the dying heartworms. Dogs undergoing heartworm treatment must have a thorough pretreatment workup prior to initiating treatment and be hospitalized during administration of the treatment drug. Melarsomine Dihydrochloride (Immiticide) is the only drug approved for use by the FDA for elimination of adult heartworms in dogs. Immiticide is given as a series of injections depending on the class of disease. Two injections are given 24 hours apart for Classes 1 or 2. One injection is given initially, then two injections given over 24 hours one to three months later for Classes 2 or 3. The best course of treatment will be determined by the veterinarian for each individual case. Then microfilaria are eliminated by administration of macrocyclic lactones. Macrocyclic lactones include Heartgard®, Revolution®, Sentinel®, or Interceptor®. Macrocyclic lactones should be started as soon as heartworm disease is diagnosed, however, caution should be used with Sentinel® or Interceptor® as these products kill microfilaria very quickly which can be harmful to the dog.

Prevention of heartworm disease is achieved by administration of a monthly preventative. It is extremely important all dogs be on a preventative in endemic areas such as Texas. Prevention includes Heartgard® and Revolution® dogs and cats, and Trifexis® and for dogs. Ferrets can be given Heartgard® or compounded ivermectin solutions. For complete protection, prevention must be given EVERY month year round in Texas.

Flea & Heartworm prevention are critically important for the health and comfort of your pets.

We are committed to being the best value for Flea & Heartworm products, better than other veterinary practices and leading online pharmacies, because we know how important they are for your pet. We believe that as your veterinarian and pet care partner, we can best navigate the complexity of product options and advise you on the safety, efficacy and cost benefit of each one, in light of your specific situation.

Online pharmacies don’t have the benefit of knowing your pet, and they certainly don’t have the veterinarian-client-patient relationship required by law to sell you prescription products. CityVet is the smart choice for all your flea and heartworm prevention needs. We make it easy for you to make choices, because we offer our own price match guarantee — just print out the page with the online pharmacies’ price on the product you desire and we’ll match that price for you, no questions asked.

Feline Heartworm Disease

Heartworm disease is spread by mosquitoes. Cases of heartworm disease have been documented in all of the 48 contiguous states. Primary hosts and reservoirs of infection are domestic and wild canines, however, other hosts are domestic cats, non-domesticated cats, ferrets, and the California sea lion.

The disease is caused by the mosquito-borne filarial parasite Dirofilaria immitis. Endemic areas such as Texas provide adequate temperature and humidity to support a viable mosquito population year-round. Mosquitoes are outdoors and indoors; therefore “indoor” animals are affected as well.

Dirofilaria immitis (heartworms) live out part of their life cycle in the mosquito, and part in the host mammal. The non-infective stage of heartworm larvae may circulate in the blood of host for more than two years following release by pregnant female in an infected animal. This animal becomes a source of infection for other dogs and cats via transmission by a mosquito. The larva (microfilaria) must be ingested by a mosquito before development to the next life stage can continue.

  • The mosquito bites an infected animal and carries the infective heartworm larvae (L1)
  • The infective heartworm matures in the mosquito in order to infect another host
  • Infective larvae (L3) migrate to proboscis (nose) of mosquito; waiting to infect another host
  • Infected larvae (called microfilaria) are deposited on the skin and enter the host through a mosquito bite wound
  • Once a host is bitten, the larvae molt and mature over the next two weeks in the subcutaneous tissues (L4)
  • The larvae mature in the heart and lungs over the next 50-70 days post mosquito bite (L5)
  • Heartworms reside in the heart, lungs, and associated vessels of the host by 70-110 days post infection
  • Adult heartworms mate and females release their offspring by 5 to 6.5 months post infection
  • Adult heartworms may survive up to 8 years in the dog, and 1 to 3 years in the cat

There are some differences between dogs and cats with respect to heartworm disease. Cats are typically more resistant to infection than dogs; however, in any area a dog can get heartworms, cats can too. Most heartworm infections of cats involve small numbers of worms (usually less than 6 worms). Cats often have unisex heartworm infections, and circulating microfilaria are seldom found in cats. Aberrant migration of heartworms to places other than the lungs and heart often happen in cats, which cause a high mortality rate. Commonly, indoor cats can be just as easily infected with heartworm disease as outdoor cats in endemic areas.

Clinical signs of heartworm disease in cats include: Coughing, intermittent dyspnea (trouble breathing), sporadic vomiting, lethargy, weight loss, nonspecific neurologic signs, and most commonly SUDDEN DEATH.

Diagnosis is not as straight forward as in dogs because cats commonly have small worm burdens or unisex infections. The antigen tests used in dogs can be negative in cats, though the cat has heartworms. When testing for heartworm in cats, both antibody and antigen blood tests should be used to aid in diagnosis of disease. Antibody tests indicate exposure to heartworms, but do not necessarily indicate disease. When antigen tests are positive, they indicate the cat has active heartworm disease, but when negative don’t rule out disease.

Currently there is no approved treatment for heartworm disease in cats. Heartworm disease is more devastating in cats than in dogs and because of their relatively small body size, cats with only a few worms are still considered to be heavily infected in terms of parasite mass. Therefore, monthly prevention is extremely important since the disease has a higher mortality in cats and no treatment exists. Prevention of heartworm disease is achieved by administration of a monthly preventative. Types of prevention include Heartgard® and Revolution® . For complete protection, prevention must be given EVERY month year round in Texas.

Dentistry

According to the American Veterinary Dental Society, 80% of dogs and 70% of cats have oral disease by the age of 3.

It is the most frequently diagnosed health problem in pets. Common signs of oral disease include tartar buildup, red and swollen gums, bad breath, changes in eating or chewing habits, pawing at the face and generalized depression. A veterinarian should evaluate your pet’s dental health at least once a year. We recommend this because bacteria and food debris accumulates around a pet’s teeth and, if left unchecked, will lead to deterioration of the soft tissue and bone surrounding the teeth. This decay results in irreversible periodontal disease and even tooth loss.

Dental Health Affects Overall Health.

We strongly recommend regular dental cleanings as part of your pet’s complete pet care. Proper and thorough dental cleanings (ultrasonic) and oral exams require anesthesia.

There are other reasons why you should pay close attention to your pet’s dental health. Dental disease can affect other organs in the body: bacteria in the mouth can get into the blood stream and may cause serious kidney infections, liver disease, lung disease, and heart valve disease. Oral disease can also indicate that another disease process is occurring elsewhere in a pet’s body. A thorough physical exam combined with appropriate laboratory work can determine if this is the case.

We can recommend and demonstrate preventative measures you can begin at home. Our wellness program emphasizes and explains how you can avoid costly dental procedures with your pet in the future.

Pre-anesthetic blood testing is strongly recommended but not required.

A complete blood count and serum chemistry prior to the procedure provides us with a better understanding of your pet’s overall health and anesthetic risk, and often allows your veterinarian to detect disease that would not be found during routine examination.

Dental Procedure includes:
  • Veterinary dental exam / charting
  • Anesthesia and monitoring
  • IV catheter and fluids
  • Cleaning (ultrasonic scaling and polishing)

Please call or visit our facility to learn more about our dental procedures.

Radiology (X-Rays)

Radiology (x-rays) is routinely used to provide valuable information about a pet’s bones, gastrointestinal tract (stomach, intestines, colon), respiratory tract (lungs), heart, and genitourinary system (bladder, prostate). It can be used alone or in conjunction with other diagnostic tools to provide a list of possible causes for a pet’s condition, identify the exact cause of a problem or rule out possible problems.

When a pet is being radiographed, an x-ray beam passes through its body and hits a piece of radiographic film. Images on the film appear as various shades of gray and reflect the anatomy of the animal. Bones, which absorb more x-rays, appear as light gray structures. Soft tissues, such as the lungs, absorb fewer x-rays and appear as dark gray structures. Interpretation of radiographs requires great skill on the part of the veterinarian.

Tonometry (Eyes)

We have the ability to test your dog or cat’s eyes for excess pressure easily and safely.

This test allows us to diagnose glaucoma and eye infections that could cause blindness if not detected and treated early. Certain breeds are more likely to develop glaucoma. Ask us if your pet is one of those breeds.

Ultrasonography

Ultrasonography, or ultrasound, is a diagnostic imaging technique similar to radiography (X-rays) and is usually used in conjunction with radiography and other diagnostic measures. It allows visualization of the deep structures of the body. Ultrasound is a useful tool for diagnosing many diseases.

Ultrasound can be used for a variety of purposes including examination of the animal’s heart, kidneys, liver, gallbladder, bladder etc. It can also be used to determine pregnancy and to monitor an ongoing pregnancy. Ultrasound can detect fluid, cysts, tumors or abscesses.

Ultrasound is a non-invasive and non-painful procedure. A ‘transducer’ (a small hand held tool) is applied to the surface of the body to which an ultrasound image is desired. Gel is used to help the transducer slide over the skin surface and create a more accurate visual image.

Sound waves are emitted from the transducer and directed into the body where they are bounced off the various organs to different degrees depending on the density of the tissues and amount of fluid present. The sounds are then fed back through the transducer and are relfected on a viewing monitor. It does not involve radiation.

Dermatology (Skin)

Dermatology refers to the study of the skin.

Skin disease is a frequently observed problem in dogs and cats. Diagnosing a skin problem in your pet may simply require an examination by a veterinarian; however, most skin diseases or problems require additional steps to accurately obtain a diagnosis. Additional diagnostic procedures may include blood work, urinalysis, skin scraping, biopsies, etc.

The cause of skin problems range from hormonal disorders to the common flea. You should book an appointment for your animal if you notice any excessive itchy behavior, loss of hair, and / or the presence of scabs or scale on the skin.

Edocrinology (Hormones)

Endocrinology is the study of hormones, and there are several common endocrine disorders found in dogs and cats.

Hypothyroidism is often diagnosed in dogs. Hypothyroidism indicates that the animal has low levels of circulating thyroid hormone. The opposite is true for cats. They are frequently diagnosed with high levels of circulating thyroid hormones. Both diseases are detrimental to your pet if untreated.

Additional endocrine problems include Diabetes Mellitus, Cushing’s Disease and Addison’s Disease.

There are many signs observable in pets with endocrine disease. These signs include (but are not limited to) the following: abnormal energy levels, abnormal behavior, abnormal drinking, urinating and eating behavior, excessive panting, skin disorders, and weight gain or loss.

Health Screening Tests
Health Screening Tests

Complete Blood Cell Count (CBC) A complete blood cell count (CBC) provides a microscopic look at the blood itself. Blood is composed of different types of cells. Red blood cells are responsible for carrying oxygen throughout the body. White blood cells are the body’s primary means of fighting infection. Platelets play an important role in blood clotting.

Chemistries A blood chemistry panel evaluates the status of the internal organs and measure levels of important blood components such as blood sugar, blood proteins, and electrolytes. Blood chemistries are commonly used to screen for diseases of the organs such as the liver or kidney, for endocrine/metabolic conditions such as diabetes and thyroid disease, and to assess the overall health of the patient.

Urinalysis (UA) An analysis of urine not only gives us information about the urinary system, but it provides some important data on other body systems as well. Evidence of some systemic problems may show up first in the urine. A urinalysis is an important component of a complete laboratory profile.

Pharmacy
Pharmacy

Our in-house pharmacy is well stocked and contains supplies that allow us to protect and treat your pet. Your prescriptions are filled immediately following your appointment with the veterinarian-no need to make a separate trip to another place. We can easily mail most prescription medications and supplements to you when you need refills as well.

Coming soon… our online pharmacy!

Chemotherapy & Cancer Treatment
Chemotherapy & Cancer Treatment

Unfortunately, animals are also susceptible to cancer.

They can develop cancer (abnormal cell growth) of the blood, the bone, the skin, the liver, etc. Spaying and neutering dogs and cats at an early age can prevent some forms of cancer. Recent advancements in cancer treatment can extend the lives of some pets dramatically. It may involve a combination of surgery and chemotherapy. An accurate diagnosis is necessary before we may begin any form of treatment.

Pain Management & Control

Research has shown that when pain is controlled, your pet heals much faster.

As in human medicine, we have a variety of medications available to manage your pet’s pain both before and after surgery and in the event of trauma. Since many pets develop arthritis, we offer a variety of ways to control pain that is tailored to your pet. Don’t hesitate to ask us to explain your options in more detail.

Referral Services
Referral Services

The majority of your pet’s health needs will be met at our practice; however, there are circumstances where a veterinary specialist may be required.

Under these circumstances, we may direct you and your pet to a specialist who is a veterinarian with advanced knowledge in a particular area of veterinary medicine or surgery. In some cases, specialized equipment is required to perform procedures that are not routinely performed by general veterinary practitioners. Examples of veterinary specialists include ophthalmologists, oncologists, surgeons, etc.

 

Additional Services

Nutrition
Nutritional Counseling

Good or Bad, Nutrition is the Foundation for Health

Most pet foods “feed” but very few of them “nourish”, despite all of their claims for health. All foods impact health either positively or negatively. And unbeknownst to most consumers, today’s pet foods are far from what nature designed dogs and cats to eat and live on. Our recommendations for feeding your pet center on a philosophy that looks to nature’s nutritional design and the science of nutrition, not savvy and often misleading messages of health fed to us by the pet food industry. Our veterinarians are passionate about getting the message out on pet food, good and bad, and how it is truly affecting our pets today. From allergies and obesity to cancer – food and nutrition play a greater role than most realize, just as it does for us humans.

It is our firm belief that choosing to understand your pet food options and choosing to feed a healthier food for your pet will make a difference in their health and their life.

Animals have various nutritional requirements depending on their age, breed and health status. Decisions regarding your pet’s nutrition should not be made without first consulting a veterinarian.

Geriatric animals have significantly different requirements than young growing puppies or kittens. Animals with diabetes or kidney disease also have different requirements.

Your veterinarian will be able to make informed decisions regarding your pet’s choice of diet given their age, breed and health status.

Microchip Pet Identification

Microchipping has become a very popular and safe way to permanently identify your pet and you as the owner in the unfortunate case that your pet is lost.

Microchipping involves placement of a small electronic chip the size and shape of a piece of rice just under the skin in the neck area. A needle is used to inject the chip. The injection is comparable to a regular vaccine.

If your pet becomes lost and is transported to a shelter, the shelter will be able to scan your pet for the chip and contact you. The scanner is similar to a scanner found in the grocery store.

We advise you to use this system of identification as well as a collar identification system on your pet.

Obedience Training

Want a well-trained dog the whole family can enjoy? The best time to start is now. Register for one of our upcoming obedience classes.

Classes

We offer a variety of intimate and affordable group obedience classes for puppies and adult dogs, including Basic Obedience, Advanced Obedience, and Leash Manners. For more information, call (214) 526-5638 or send an email to Training@CityVet.com.

You can also connect with us on Facebook and view our Events Page for the latest obedience training offerings.

Location

All classes are located at The Dog Lofts Oak Lawn, located at 2732 Oak Lawn Avenue, Dallas, TX, 75219.

Oak Lawn

Behavioral & Grief Counseling
Behavioral Counseling

We offer individualized dog and cat behavioral counseling on a variety of issues including aggressive behavior and inappropriate elimination. If you are concerned about some aspect of your pet’s behavior, please contact us and request an appointment with our veterinarians.

Grief Counseling

The loss of a pet can be a tragic event. The emotions we have as a result of this loss are real, justifiable and nothing to be ashamed of. Our team understands these feelings, as many of us have faced this in our own lives. We also have literature that can help you and your children deal with the loss of a family pet. Please don’t hesitate to contact us regarding this issue.

Exotic Pet Medicine & Surgery

We are pleased to offer you veterinary services at most of our locations for ferrets, lizards, hamsters, snakes, rabbits, guinea pigs, and other small but important pets.

Ferrets

Your ferret should be examined yearly by a veterinarian. A stool sample for parasite check should be submitted at the same time as the yearly check up. Vaccines are available for ferrets and can be discussed with you during your visit.

Common problems associated with ferrets include gastrointestinal disease (diarrhea), parasites and cancer. Ferrets are inquisitive creatures by nature and frequently ingest objects they shouldn’t. Any loss of appetite or abnormal behavior should alert you to a potential problem and the need for veterinary consultation.

Gerbils, Guinea Pigs & Hamsters

Your furry friends require veterinary attention too! You should seek veterinary attention if your pet stops eating, appears quieter than normal, exhibits discharge from the eyes or nose, and/or develops a lump on its body. Teeth grow continuously in these small animals and often require attention.

Iguanas & Other Lizards

These interesting and entertaining creatures are frequently presented to veterinarians for nutrition related problems. We strongly advise you to set up a nutritional consultation with our veterinarians to discuss how you may best avoid these conditions.

All reptiles should have yearly examinations and parasite checks.

Rabbits

Rabbits are susceptible to a variety of conditions including hairballs, overgrown teeth, parasites and cancer. If your rabbit stops eating, appears overly quiet, experiences discharge from the eyes and/or nose, you should have him or her examined by a veterinarian.

Rabbits should be examined yearly by your veterinarian. Wellness blood testing and parasite checks may be recommended.

Others

We provide medical assessments and surgical procedures for a variety of other exotic animals including mice, rats, sugar gliders, pot-bellied pigs and hedgehogs. We see many diseases related to improper nutrition in these animals. Please talk to us about how to properly feed your pet as most of these diseases can be prevented with a fundamental knowledge of their nutritional requirements.

Avian Medicine & Surgery

Did you know budgies, parrots and songbirds require regular veterinary attention too?

We advise annual visits to the vet for your feathery friends. During their yearly check up, we will examine your bird’s beak, nails and feathers to determine if they require any specialized attention. Some birds require more frequent examinations. Since birds are notorious for hiding illness, we also recommend annual wellness blood testing to catch disease in it’s early stages.

Note: A bird that doesn’t groom itself correctly and exhibits a ruffled, un-kept look associated with its feathers is usually a sick bird and should be examined as soon as possible by a veterinarian.

Beak Trims

Beaks grow continuously and healthy birds wear their beaks evenly. Some birds develop problems with their beaks and require veterinary assistance to trim and grind the beak to a normal functioning appearance. Do not attempt to trim your bird’s beak at home.

Sexing

Determining the sex of many birds can be very difficult and in some cases, impossible, if relying solely on physical appearance. A blood test can be done to determine the sex of your bird. Please feel free to consult with us about these procedures.

Toe Nail Trims

Most birds require their nails to be trimmed on a regular basis. Trimming the nails of birds too short can be detrimental to the bird. Blood vessels inside the nail are easily ‘nicked’ during the trimming process. Be careful if you perform this procedure at home. We suggest it only be performed at home if you have a small bird with white nails. We also suggest you have a readily accessible ‘caustic’ agent available to use if the nail begins to bleed. Alternatively, bring your bird to us on a regular basis and we will trim or grind away the appropriate amount of nail.

Note: Do not use sandpaper perches! They do not wear down the nails and they can cause skin problems.

Wing Clippings

Wing clipping is performed on birds to inhibit their flying abilities. It is a non-painful procedure that ensures the safety of your bird in its environment. A bird that has had it wings trimmed will no longer be at risk of flying into a ceiling fan or into a window. There are several techniques available to preserve the aesthetic appearance of your bird. Please call to discuss this option further or to set up an appointment.

 

Surgical Services

Our Services Overview